Sentencing delayed for Tina Hunt facing six years in prison for kicking Cook County Sheriff's Deputy on shin - Sheriff Tom Dart doesn't want the woman to go to prison.....

The fix is in.. Women with six previous felony convictions has sentenced delayed after kicking/attacking a Cook County Deputy Sheriff.  She faced a minimum six year sentence until the cop hating Chicago Tribune featured her story on the front page.. Sheriff Tom Dart's office initially stated it was 'unfortunate' she may get 6 years but defended the Aggravated Battery charge...  Anita Alvarez office more forcefully defended the Deputy saying the charges were warranted.  Now it seems they are all backtracking..  Judge Erica Reddick allowed the delay in sentencing and if the charges are downgraded the six time felon could get probation.. Of course the Cook County Sheriff's office is not objecting to the charges being downgraded..  Tom  Dart places rapists, robbers, and murderers on house arrest. Why change course now!!!!  

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A West Side Felon Wildebeest facing six years in prison for kicking a Cook County sheriff's deputy on the shin had her sentencing delayed Wednesday after her attorney argued the prison sentence would be improper.

In a last-minute filing, Tina Hunt's attorney contended that prosecutors were seeking an improper "double enhancement" when they said Hunt should be sentenced as a Class X felon. Prosecutors sought to delay sentencing so they could respond in writing.

In a front-page story this week, the Tribune chronicled how Hunt, 49, was convicted of aggravated battery to a peace officer after kicking a sheriff's deputy on the left shin. She had gone to the Leighton Criminal Court Building in November 2013 to attend her son's court date but then got into an altercation with a deputy.

The deputy had testified at trial that the kick didn't injure him, but Hunt, who says she has been diagnosed as bipolar, was convicted of the felony for making "insulting or provoking" contact with the officer. Since Hunt had long-ago convictions for two other Class 2 felonies — a 1988 conviction for armed robbery and home invasion and a 1997 conviction for robbery — she faced a mandatory minimum of six years in prison under Illinois law.

Hunt's attorney argued Wednesday that the case should have been charged as misdemeanor battery but was enhanced under the law to Class 3 felony because Hunt kicked a peace officer. It was then further upgraded to Class 2 felony because Hunt knew she was kicking a peace officer, then enhanced again under Illinois' version of the "three-strikes" law because of her two Class 2 convictions.

"It's really a quadruple enhancement, which we think is impermissible," Hunt's lawyer, Jeffrey Neslund, said outside the courtroom. "It doesn't take into consideration the remoteness of the convictions. I mean, a lot changes in 29 years, in 19 years, so to just automatically, without any other consideration, factor that in and say this is your third strike, you gotta go ... is just wrong.

"If you kick a police officer, there should be a penalty. There should've been a misdemeanor resisting arrest charge and that's what the penalty should've been in this case," he said. "There was no injury in this case."

Cara Smith, policy chief for Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart, said sheriff's deputies responded properly to Hunt's misbehavior at the courthouse and were unaware of her extensive criminal background or the role it would play at any sentencing.

Judge Erica Reddick, who is being asked to reconsider Hunt's felony conviction, found her guilty following a one-day bench trial in November.

If successful, Hunt would be sentenced for a Class 3 felony and could receive probation because her last felony conviction — for drug possession — took place 13 years ago, Neslund said.

Hunt said she is hopeful the judge will overrule prosecutors and give her probation when she is sentenced next month.

"People make mistakes, but they change too," Hunt told reporters after the court hearing. "Society got to give them a chance to show them that they changed.

"Right now I'm depressed about this," she said, "but I know my God is going to see me through."
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